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Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley speaks to members of the audience during the Conversations with the Prime Minister last night.

Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley said Easter Sunday gives the world a renewed hope that is particularly required at this time.

As he extended Easter greetings to the nation, he said the resurrection of Jesus Christ, which is being commemorated today, is a reminder that “no matter how dark a situation, as the present may seem, there is always hope for a brighter tomorrow.”

Dr Rowley said: “Many have doubts that Trinidad and Tobago will ever overcome the challenges before us, because of the global uncertainty. But I assure you that despite what you may see or hear, in some quarters, the Government you elected in 2020 is working toward the benefit of all the people of this country.

“The Government will not give up on the mission which the citizens of this country assigned us. With your input and patience, we are going to achieve better levels of health, security and prosperity for this country together.”

He urged citizens to reflect on T&T’s history and the many hurdles the nation has overcome. He also pointed out that this country is not the only one in the world facing socio-economic and psychological challenges caused by the pandemic as “we continue to battle with COVID-19, the acquisition of vaccines, the challenging economic circumstances, gender-based violence and other crimes.”

Dr Rowley added: “We need to understand that the outcome will depend on how we view our current position. Let us search for the opportunities, which are all around us, to ensure that we overcome this trying period together.

“To the young men of our country, in particular, I speak to you directly today on the issues of crime and gender-based violence: Use Easter to reflect on your lives. Learn to love and respect our women, and our society.

“Men must recognise women as our counterparts, playing an equal role, in our society. At Easter, we recall that women were the ones who found the risen Christ over 2000 years ago.”

He appealed to young people to “find paths of tolerance and compassion in their relationships. Overall, gender-based violence and other violent crime ought not to be among the most identifiable features of this country’s social landscape.”

“As we spend this Easter Sunday with our families, let us take time to reflect on the life of Christ, then turn to our inner strengths. Let us look deep within ourselves, with questions of how can we use the strengths that reside within us all to propel us forward during this period,” Dr Rowley said.